Posted 4 months ago
Hi there, Ming! I love your artwork! So, in my Business of Art class, we were discussing women in comics. Most of the guys in my class said that women only get jobs from editors because they're attractive or cute. I'm the only girl in my class, so I stayed out of it to avoid trouble. As a woman trying to break into comics myself, this worries me. I'm far from what most would consider attractive, but for all the other girls out there trying to get work, what would you say to that? Thank you!
fictional-sailor asked

mingdoyle:

The short, practical answer: Most business is conducted entirely over email. Your editors may hire you, work with you for years, and if you don’t post selfies or attend conventions, they may never know what you look like. Even if they do know what you look like, editors care more about your quality of work, your timeliness and your professionalism, than any selfie. Be fearless, do the work, make connections online, and of course you can flourish!

The long, twisted answer: Yes. We’re women, it’s inevitable that we’ll be judged, coveted, and derided purely on the basis of our looks, our age, our perceived sexual availability. These judgments crash against us at every turn in life. They’re inescapable, and yes, explicitly or implicitly, from men and from women, you will confront these judgments and many more during your professional career. 

If you choose to make your gender public knowledge, some readers will be cruel to you. They’ll seem to single your art out more loudly and consistently than any equivalently accomplished male counterpart’s for pillorying. They’ll call your lines ugly, and in the comments section they will call you ugly. Or, they’ll be too kind to you. It won’t matter how unattractive you may think you are, they’ll speak to you too long at conventions, they’ll stare and say you’re even prettier than your art, and that will be worse, because if you can be the target of such bombastic, lecherous praise, then maybe your art is actually just as bad as you’ve been made to feel.

If you choose to make your gender public knowledge, some readers will support you. They’ll support you unfailingly, they’ll class you as a “woman creator” and they’ll ask you to provide sound bites that speak for all women, though of course that’s impossible. They’ll put you on a “Women in Comics” panel at every show, and often that will be the only panel you’re ever on. They’ll buy your work because you’re a woman, just because you’re a woman.

Have I gotten more or less work because of the way I look? Like you, I bear all the lifelong mental wounds of growing up in this society and consider myself “far from what most would consider attractive.” I think a lot of women do. But when I was first breaking in, I encountered my fair share of sexually charged interest and dismissal, in equal turns. I’ve escaped from gross situations with professionals and never worked with them, but also never spoken publically about those intimidating experiences. I’ve been hired to be in multiple woman-themed anthologies exclusively because I was a woman. I’ve been in an Asian-themed anthology because I’m Asian. Almost any review of my work from the first five years of my career begins, “Drawn by the lovely/beautiful/hot/exotic and talented Ming Doyle…”

Whatever you are in this life, however you look or identify or are identified, it’s going to impact you professionally and personally. Attractive, unattractive, majority, minority, there’s no getting out untouched. And if that sounds grossly generalizing and invasive, that’s because that’s what a lot of these experiences are like.

But remember what I said way back up there in the short answer, about being fearless? Do that. Yes, there’s a host of adversities attached to embarking upon any endeavor as a woman, and comics come with their own unique and prickly set. But if you love what you do, if you’re good at it and you can persevere, if you can access the core of who you are as a person and align that with what you want to accomplish as an artist and hold that knowledge as a shield in front of everything you do, you can make it! And I hope you will, because I want to see you here. For all the awful people who may make the journey rough or unpleasant for you, there is a large number of people who want to employ you and want to stand with you professionally.

Thank you. And please, even after I’ve said all that, GO FOR IT! It’s not going to be easy, but it was never going to be. The secret is that it’s not easy for anyone, and in the end that’s what’s going to make you a goddamn warrior.

Reason #3,251 why mingdoyle is awesome.

Posted 1 year ago

adamwarrock:

On Monday, my Third Annual Donation Drive will begin. From June 24 thru July 3, I’ll be accepting donations of any amount, and donors will receive a rewards package including a new album, a live video concert, and a digital comics bundle from various comic publishers and creators. I’ll also be debuting two new music videos and a slew of new songs for everyone. So starting Monday, a whole lot of activity will happen at adamwarrock.com

Before all that starts, let me say a few things…

I’ve been lucky enough to do music full-time for the past three years, and you’ve been gracious enough to give me your time and attention in listening to songs about everything from mo-capped dogs to Ryan Gosling to Adventure Time. We’ve been able to share our enthusiasm, joy, and love for these silly things that mean so much to us, and together, I’d like to think that we’ve done our best in keeping the fires of enthusiasm burn a bit brighter than they would’ve without our efforts. 

Since the beginning of this year alone, I have released a total of about 71 songs. That’s a total of about 3 songs a week: all of them for completely free, costing nothing more than your time and attention. I believe very strongly in keeping things free around here, for this simple reason: I believe your time and attention are valuable, your enthusiasm for what I do here, for the music I make and this thing I’ve built up, it’s invaluable, and I will always treat it like that. 

Because of this, I do a Donation Drive once a year where I ask you to give something, any amount, to keep this site going and to keep things free, to allow content and fun to flow freely through the internet, to make these songs that hopefully bring you some happiness in your cubicle, or your commute, or your desk job, or wherever you listen to music during the day. 

I don’t accept donations at any point during the year, and unless I am selling an actual album or tshirt, everything that I do is free. I work hard to make your donation worthwhile, and this year, I’ve spent almost 8 months preparing, shooting video, calling in favors, and building a donor package that I feel is worth your time and attention, and hopefully, your money. 

As I always say, if you can’t donate, don’t. There will always be free music at my site, and I’m not in the business of making life harder for anyone. But if you can, and find it in your heart to give, I hope you’ll consider donating to keep this site running for another year, to help me do bigger and greater things, to show people that independent art can exist and thrive without this institutional belief that you HAVE to do things a certain way. I have never done things the conventional way, I have heard so many people tell me that I’m doing it wrong, that i won’t succeed, that what I do isn’t sustainable, and you’ve helped me prove them wrong. Oh, how sweet it feels. 

But most importantly, the Donation Drive is an annual way to celebrate this idea these all these things I make music about: these comics, tv shows, movies, video games, whatever… these seemingly silly things can be important to us, can be celebrated, that together we can help spread some more joy throughout those weird corners of the web, and have a great time doing it. 

Thank you for your time, for your attention, for your support for these past three years. Starting Monday, I’ll do my best to earn your contribution. But even if it all ended tomorrow, I’d still say thank you for the greatest three years of my life, and some experiences I’ll never forget.

Hodor. 

-Eugene Ahn aka Adam WarRock 

(photo by Keith Binder

Posted 1 year ago

BEYOND THE BAD AND THE UGLY storified.

chowleen:

An informative, thorough, and witty summation by Keith Chow of SECRET IDENTITIES, of this past weekend’s Asian American Summit on Stereotypes that took place at the Japanese American National Museum in LA. 

Inspiring and intersectional. Kudos to @originalspin Jeff Yang, Keith Chow, and the whole SI crew.

imageimage via amanda @a_wah

Posted 1 year ago

jerryma-art:

UPDATE:

this here is the updated version of the poster which will be opening up the CAAMfest in San Francisco March 14th!

hey guys,

i was lucky/fortunate/honored to get the chance to work on this project….

the movie/documentary…Linsanity!

this movie…is more than just a chance to relive those magical moments that consumed New York last year.  it’s a chance to show that hard work and perseverance really does pay off.

if you get the chance…check out the kickstarter page HERE.

this movie/documentary premieres January 20th at The Sundance Film Festival in Utah, Park City.  And you better believe I’m totally pumped to be going.

but this movie is going to need your help to come to life.  and even a dollar would help make this dream come to life one more time.

thanks so much.

-jerry

www.epicprops.com

@epicprops.com

Posted 1 year ago

jerryma-art:

yesterday, february 4th was the one year linversary.

did this for fun.

sorry for being a day late.

read more about it HERE.

-jerry

www.epicprops.com

@epicprops

Posted 1 year ago

The Huddle: The Joy Dunk Club

nprhuddle:

This one’s for Jeremy Lin fans… The Joy Dunk Club (Best. Name. Ever.), hosted by Asian CineVision’sCineVue, is a new web-based roundtable video talk show about everybody’s favorite Asian American NBA star.


Created and hosted by Terry Park of Hyphen magazine, each show will feature…

Terry Park’s new JLin-centric web show Joy Dunk Club (feat SIUniverse’s Keith Chow and Ren Hsieh) made NPR’s sports tumblr!

Posted 1 year ago
adamwarrock:

December 4. New EP, $6. Also, a hella huge merch firesale:
Tshirts: $5, except Robot Slide New Shirts which are $10. Sizes are limited! 
CDs: $5; EPs $2. 
Buy 2 or more things I’ll throw in some random free shit! 
All at adamwarrock.bandcamp.com. 

Who needs #BlackFriday when you have WarRock Wednesday?

adamwarrock:

December 4. New EP, $6. Also, a hella huge merch firesale:

  • Tshirts: $5, except Robot Slide New Shirts which are $10. Sizes are limited! 
  • CDs: $5; EPs $2. 
  • Buy 2 or more things I’ll throw in some random free shit! 

All at adamwarrock.bandcamp.com

Who needs #BlackFriday when you have WarRock Wednesday?

Posted 1 year ago

ladiesmakingcomics:

Market Monday

Shattered: The Asian-American Comics Anthology TP, includes work by Ming Doyle, Christine Norrie, Robin Ha, Natalie Kim, Kripa Joshi, Keiko Agena, Wendy Xu, Alice Meichi Li, Amy Chu, Yasmin Liang, and more!

Three years after the publication of the groundbreaking Asian American comics anthology Secret Identities, the team returns with a new volume-bigger, bolder, and more breathtaking in scope. This new book expands its horizon to include edgier genres, from hard-boiled pulp to horror, adventure, fantasy, and science fiction. Using this darker range of hues, it seeks to subvert and shatter the hidebound stereotypes that have obscured the Asian image since the earliest days of immigration: the stoic brute, the prodigious brain, the exotic temptress, the inscrutable alien, the devious manipulator. Shattered’s 35 stories incorporate thrills, chills, and delight while exposing the hidden issues and vital truths of the nation’s fastest-growing and most dynamic community, and features a cover by DC Comics’ superstar Cliff Chiang!

Posted 1 year ago

#SHATTERED makes io9's GN list!

io9 says #SHATTERED is a GN even non-comics fans will love!

Posted 1 year ago

ICYMI an animated teaser for #SHATTERED (in stores now!) by the talented